Excellent and powerful representation

Posted by Maury, April 20, 2016 Howard represented me in court yesterday for the first time and very impressed. Howard is concise and very powerful with his words leaving no stone unturned. Howard consistently pushed back on the opposing attorney and did not back down, swaying the Judge to allow certain motions that she wasn’t going to allow earlier. After seeing Howard in action yesterday, I have total confidence my settlement will exceed my expectations. I highly recommend Howard.
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Highly Recommended – Knowledgeable, Compassionate and Professional

Posted by Anthony, March 17, 2016 Howard was the lead attorney for my matter and I worked with Joshua Robbins from the firm. During the course of my divorce, Joshua provided outstanding legal guidance as well as ensuring that my legal cost were efficiently managed for me throughout the process. He was also very responsive via e mail and phone whenever I had questions and compassionate when I was stressed. At one pointy, I thought the process was becoming too stressful; Howard stepped to expedite finalizing my divorce. Even when Joshua was not able to make the final court appearance, Ann Karpenski, partner with the firm, stepped in seamlessly to close out my divorce. Howard and his entire team made a very difficult situation much easier to deal with.
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An Intro To Filing For Divorce In Massachusetts

Many couples start out in marriage with great hopes and expectations, only to end up in a relationship that unfortunately does not work. There are many steps in the divorce process in Massachusetts and just as many avenues to take depending on your situation. Here is a brief introduction to filing for divorce in Massachusetts and some of what you may encounter. A divorce can be categorized as “no-fault” or “fault.” If both parties agree on the categorization, the divorce is called “uncontested.” If one of the two parties disagrees with it, though, it is then called “contested.” A fault divorce can be more costly and drawn out than a no-fault one. This is because of the process required to prove the fault of the accused spouse. There are seven categories of a fault divorce: adultery, impotency, desertion, cruel and abusive treatment, gross and confirmed habits of intoxication, a prison
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When Parents Are Separated, Who Has Child Custody?

Making the decision to separate from your spouse/partner is difficult and often occurs over a lengthy period of time. During that time, it’s common for spouses/partners to begin living in separate households. If the partners have children, this raises many questions about where and with whom the children should live. Massachusetts law has put in place some very distinct laws to handle this sort of child custody dispute. If the parents are not married, the mother automatically has sole legal and physical custody until a Court orders something else. However under Massachusetts law, if the parents are married to each other, both parents share legal and physical custody of the children until a Court decides otherwise. Does this mean a mother or father is not allowed to take the children with them in the event that they move out of the family home? The simple answer is no. Under current
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Child Support in Massachusetts

In a Massachusetts divorce, one parent may be ordered by the court to pay child support. Under Massachusetts law, both parents are required to support their children—and this is true regardless of marital status (whether the parents are married, divorced, separated, or were never married). The parent the child lives with is termed the custodial parent. The noncustodial parent may be required to pay child support. Child support is complicated, but there are several things you should know. One, child support may be used to pay for housing, food, clothing, education, and insurance and medical costs. Two, if one parent has received an order for child support and the other parent is not paying it, payment can be compelled. The procedure is to file a Complaint for Contempt with the appropriate Court. This means that, if the other parent does not obey the child support order, he or she can
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Divorce Modifications in the State of Massachusetts

When the terms of your divorce no longer fit your present circumstances, petitioning for divorce modification can help alter the terms accordingly. In the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, overturning a divorce decree requires an appeal. The appeal process is often drawn-out because one appellate court will need to overturn a lower court’s decision. Appeals are usually unsuccessful except in the case of exceptional and compelling circumstances. The following are common examples of situations that warrant a divorce modification. 1. Moving a long distance from an ex-spouse. 2. A needed increase of alimony. Spousal support is not mandatory in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It depends upon the income and situation of the spouses. 3. Dramatic increase or decrease of income for former spouse under a child support order. 4. A child not being properly supervised by parent or current partner of parent due to psychological or substance abuse problems. 5. A teenage
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Divorce in Massachusetts: How to Get Started

Deciding to end a marriage is a difficult and stressful decision. But, the decision is only the first step in ending a marriage. Once you have decided that divorce is best for you and your spouse, the next step is finding an attorney. A law firm well-versed in Massachusetts law pertaining to divorce can help make the dissolution of your marriage as painless and smooth as possible. When you begin looking for representation, it is important that you understand exactly what your needs are to choose an attorney best-suited for your situation. Below are a few basic things you should look for in a divorce attorney. Licensed and experienced in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Client reviews verifying a positive track record and good outcomes Good standing with the Board of Bar Overseers Someone you’re comfortable with, listens and communicates well with you In your selection process, there are a few
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Limited Assistance Representation

Limited Assistance Representation allows an attorney to assist a self-represented client with specific issues on a limited basis.  This might include preparing or reviewing documents, appearing in court or giving legal advice, hence the term unbundled services.  This type of limited representation, compensated or pro bono, permits the attorney to withdraw representation after completing agreed upon services. Although the attorney does not fully participate, the attorney owes the client the same duties of loyalty, competence and confidentiality for the limited representation as he would under full service representation.  The attorney also must review the limitations of the legal assistance with the client, for example in a written description.
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Separation Agreements

Separation agreements allow you to outline specifically in a divorce what you agree to. This might include details about child support, alimony, taxes, and name changes. What you put in the agreement is specific to the situation and concerns you may have. There are two forms of a separation agreement in Massachusetts. One functions as a contract and is binding when you and the other party sign it. The other is non-binding until you get the approval of the judge. However, in both cases each party must agree to sign the agreement. Which type of separation agreement depends on specific details of the case. A lawyer can best outline the difference. If a judge thinks it is unfair or that someone was forced to sign it, he or she may not sign off on it. Further, when children are involved, the agreement must be seen as in the “best interest
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